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An archive of New Yorker articles by Malcolm Gladwell, author of the recent book The Tipping Point. Without even being aware until recently of who this author is, I realize scanning the list of articles in this collection that it has been his writing that has recently been the most compelling in my intermittnet relationship with the New Yorker. Among other topics, he writes about: fads, “spin”, public opinion and mass psychology, “who decides what’s cool”, the “six degrees of separation”, the Belgian Coca Cola hysteria, whether parenting matters… I’m sure you’ll find something you’ll want to read. Update: summary of critics’ opinions about The Tipping Point here, from Slate.

Uncategorized

An archive of New Yorker articles by Malcolm Gladwell, author of the recent book The Tipping Point. Without even being aware until recently of who this author is, I realize scanning the list of articles in this collection that it has been his writing that has recently been the most compelling in my intermittnet relationship with the New Yorker. Among other topics, he writes about: fads, “spin”, public opinion and mass psychology, “who decides what’s cool”, the “six degrees of separation”, the Belgian Coca Cola hysteria, whether parenting matters… I’m sure you’ll find something you’ll want to read. Update: summary of critics’ opinions about The Tipping Point here, from Slate.

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“The American Museum of Natural History

yesterday bluntly refused to give back a

10,000-year-old, 15-ton meteorite to the Oregon

Indian tribes who say their ancestors once treated the

behemoth as a sacred object.

In papers filed in Manhattan federal court to block

the Indians’ claim to the “Willamette Meteorite” —

one of the museum’s oldest treasures and a

centerpiece of its renovated planetarium — the

museum argued the extraterrestrial isn’t covered by

federal law that allows Indians to “repatriate” some

cultural items.” [New York Post]

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Banned in Turkey:

The Turkish government confiscated all available copies of Jonathan Ames’ novel The Extra Man last week, and

will try both his translator, Fatih Ozguven, and his publisher in Istanbul, Iletisim, on charges that the book is

“corrupt and harmful to the morality of Turkish readers,” according to a fax Ames’ international rights agent

Rosalie Siegel received from Istanbul. The book had been out a few months, and had been submitted to

government censors for approval before publishing, as is required in Turkey. [New York Press]

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Before he died, “Peanuts” creator Charles M. Schultz told his

family he didn’t want anyone else drawing his strip, and that

animated shows based on the characters should end as well. But

when Schultz began the strip in the 1950s cartoonists routinely

gave up their copyrights to distributors. United Media owns the

“Peanuts” copyright and it got 61 percent of its $84.9 million in

1998 revenues from the comics, TV shows and licensing deals.

Think they’ll let the franchise go dark? [SF Examiner]

Uncategorized

“The American Museum of Natural History

yesterday bluntly refused to give back a

10,000-year-old, 15-ton meteorite to the Oregon

Indian tribes who say their ancestors once treated the

behemoth as a sacred object.

In papers filed in Manhattan federal court to block

the Indians’ claim to the “Willamette Meteorite” —

one of the museum’s oldest treasures and a

centerpiece of its renovated planetarium — the

museum argued the extraterrestrial isn’t covered by

federal law that allows Indians to “repatriate” some

cultural items.” [New York Post]

Uncategorized

Banned in Turkey:

The Turkish government confiscated all available copies of Jonathan Ames’ novel The Extra Man last week, and

will try both his translator, Fatih Ozguven, and his publisher in Istanbul, Iletisim, on charges that the book is

“corrupt and harmful to the morality of Turkish readers,” according to a fax Ames’ international rights agent

Rosalie Siegel received from Istanbul. The book had been out a few months, and had been submitted to

government censors for approval before publishing, as is required in Turkey. [New York Press]

Uncategorized

Before he died, “Peanuts” creator Charles M. Schultz told his

family he didn’t want anyone else drawing his strip, and that

animated shows based on the characters should end as well. But

when Schultz began the strip in the 1950s cartoonists routinely

gave up their copyrights to distributors. United Media owns the

“Peanuts” copyright and it got 61 percent of its $84.9 million in

1998 revenues from the comics, TV shows and licensing deals.

Think they’ll let the franchise go dark? [SF Examiner]