Work-Related Burnout Has a New Official Definition

Unknown’Most of us have experienced a vague sense of feeling “burned out” by work, but now there’s a specific definition for what that actually means. The World Health Organization recently updated their International Classification of Disease codes (ICD–11) to define burnout as a syndrome with three dimensions.

The new definition doesn’t mean that burnout (or, as they call it, “burn-out”) is a disease; it’s classified as a “factor influencing health status.” Here’s the new definition:

Burn-out is a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed. It is characterized by three dimensions: 1) feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion; 2) increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job; and 3) reduced professional efficacy. Burn-out refers specifically to phenomena in the occupational context and should not be applied to describe experiences in other areas of life.

If you feel like you meet the criteria for burnout, you might want to mention it next time you’re seeking medical or mental health care. On its own, burnout isn’t considered a medical condition, but it represents added stress in your life that you may need to deal with…’

Via Lifehacker

Related: How America Created “Burnout”:

Steven Hopper notes that working overtime is the norm in America, that many cannot afford time off from work in the only advanced economy that does not mandate paid vacation leave for its workers. Even when paid time off is provided, many Americans do not use their available time off. 

‘American society has bred a culture of “work harder to get ahead”, so many Americans feel like taking vacation would mean sacrificing their future career success. It is precisely this culture of work more and vacation less that is leading to increased rates of burn-out among Americans…’

Via Medium

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