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Famous Monsters of Filmland’s 1965 guide to home monster makeup

Cory Doctorow writes:

‘The Do-It-Yourself Monster Make-Up Handbook is a 1965 classic: Famous Monsters of Filmland founder Forrest Ackerman tapped movie makeup legend Dick Smith to create guides for turning yourself into any of three Martians, two kinds of werewolf, a “weird-oh,” a “derelict,” a ghoul, a mummy, Frankenstein’s monster, Quasimodo, Mr Hyde, “split face,” and more…’
Source: Boing Boing

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What George W. Bush Really Thought of Trump’s Inauguration

Yashar Ali writes:

‘Bush’s endearing struggle with his poncho at the event quickly became a meme, prompting many Democrats on social media to admit that they already pined for the relative normalcy of his administration. Following Trump’s short and dire speech, Bush departed the scene and never offered public comment on the ceremony.

But, according to three people who were present, Bush gave a brief assessment of Trump’s inaugural after leaving the dais: “That was some weird shit.” All three heard him say it.

A spokesman for Bush declined to comment. …’

Source: New York Magazine

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William Powell, ‘Anarchist Cookbook’ Writer, Dies at 66

William Powell was a teenager, angry at the government and the Vietnam War, when he walked into the main branch of the New York Public Library in Manhattan in 1969 to begin research for a handbook on causing violent mayhem.

Over the next months, he studied military manuals and other publications that taught him the essentials of do-it-yourself warfare, including how to make dynamite, how to convert a shotgun into a grenade launcher and how to blow up a bridge.

What emerged was “The Anarchist Cookbook,” a diagram- and recipe-filled manifesto that is believed to have been used as a source in heinous acts of violence since its publication in 1971, most notably the killings of 12 students and one teacher in 1999 at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo.

Throughout his manual, Mr. Powell fashioned a knowing voice that suggested broad experience in warfare, sabotage or black ops, mixed with an extremist’s anti-establishment worldview.

“As almost everyone knows, silencers are illegal in virtually all the countries of the world,” he wrote before describing how to build a silencer for a handgun, “but then a true revolutionary believes that the government in power is illegal, so, following that logic, I see no reason that he should feel restricted by laws made by an illegal body.”

He declared that his book was an educational service for the silent majority — not the one identified by President Richard M. Nixon as his middle-American constituency, but the disciplined anarchists who were seeking dignity in a world gone wrong. To them, he offered how-to plans for weaponry and explosives as well as drugs, electronic surveillance, guerrilla training and hand-to-hand combat — a potent mix that attracted the attention of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

The book found a big audience. More than two million copies have reportedly been sold, and still more have been downloaded on the internet.

Source: New York Times obituary

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‘Power Must Be Taken’: Excerpts From ‘The Anarchist Cookbook’

‘In 1971, William Powell published “The Anarchist Cookbook,” a collection of recipes for drugs, weapons, bombs and other forms of mayhem. He saw the book as a manifesto and guide for would-be revolutionaries, while the authorities saw it as a potential threat; the Federal Bureau of Investigation maintained files on the book for years.Mr. Powell died in July, but his death did not become widely known until this month, with the release of “American Anarchist,” a documentary film about him.Here are excerpts from “The Anarchist Cookbook,” courtesy of Delta Press, its most-recent publisher…’

Source: New York Times