Why contemporary experiments always work the first time (and always fail the second time)

UnknownVia Myths of Vision Science:

‘…[T]he popular type of study I’ve just described is known not to replicate. And while a lot of ink has been spilled (not least in the pages of Nature) over the ongoing “replication crisis” in neuroscience; while we even have a “Center for Reproducible Neuroscience” at Stanford; while paper after paper has pointed out the barrenness of the procedure (Jonas & Kording’s (2017) “Can a neuroscientist understand a microprocessor?” was a popular one); while the problems with post hoc inferences have been known to philosophers and scientists for hundreds of years; the technique remains the dominant one. As Konrad Kording has admitted, practitioners get around the non-replication problem simply by avoiding doing replications.

So there you have it; a sure-fire method for learning…nothing….’

(Thanks, Noah)

New Scientist 2009 trivia quiz

“If you want to read about the big science stories of the year, you have come to the wrong place – turn back to the news review gallery. Here we are celebrating the science trivia of 2009. Read on and test your mental mettle in New Scientist's annual end of year quiz, and we will see whether 2009 has truly been the Year of Science as promoted by the Coalition on the Public Understanding of Science, or rather a Year of Superstition, Ignorance and Minds Like a Sieve.” (New Scientist)

Diamond no longer nature’s hardest material

Diamond Age

‘Diamond will always be a girl’s best friend, but it may soon lose favour with industrial drillers.

The gemstone lost its title of the “world’s hardest material” some time ago, to man-made nanomaterials of slightly greater toughness. Now a rare natural substance looks likely to leave them all far behind – at 58% harder than diamond.

The first, wurtzite boron nitride has a similar structure to diamond, but is made up of different atoms.

The second, the mineral lonsdaleite, or hexagonal diamond is made from carbon atoms just like diamond, but they are arranged in a different shape.’ via New Scientist.

Related??

Drillers break into magma chamber

The Volcano Rumbles

“Drillers looking for geothermal energy in Hawaii have inadvertently put a well right into a magma chamber.

Molten rock pushed back up the borehole several metres before solidifying, making it perfectly safe to study.

Magma specialist Bruce Marsh says it will allow scientists to observe directly how granites are made.

“This is unprecedented; this is the first time a magma has been found in its natural habitat,” the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, professor told BBC News.”

via BBC.