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Training New Jedis in the Ways of the Force

MIAMI GARDENS - FEBRUARY 3: Children participa...‘To an outsider, it might seem like stage-fighting with battery-powered lightsabers, but to Mr. Michael, it is aspiring righteous warriors communing with the Force, that energy that gives the Jedi his power and binds the galaxy. So what if the place attracts, as Mr. Michael said, “a bunch of ‘Star Wars’ dorks.” ‘ (via NYTimes)

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The Curator’s Code

image of a curator holding ancient coins

“While we have systems in place for literary citation, image attribution, and scientific reference, we don’t yet have a system that codifies the attribution of discovery in curation as a currency of the information economy, a system that treats discovery as the creative labor that it is.

This is what The Curator’s Code is – a system for honoring the creative and intellectual labor of information discovery by making attribution consistent and codified, the celebrated norm.

It’s an effort to make the rabbit hole open, fair, and ever-alluring.” (via curator’s ǝpoɔ)

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Free Self-Replicating Machines are here

English: RepRap v.2 'Mendel' open-source FDM 3...

‘RepRap is a free desktop 3D printer capable of printing plastic objects. Since many parts of RepRap are made from plastic and RepRap can print those parts, RepRap is a self-replicating machine – one that anyone can build given time and materials. It also means that – if you’ve got a RepRap – you can print lots of useful stuff, and you can print another RepRap for a friend…

RepRap was the first of the low-cost 3D printers, and the RepRap Project started the open-source 3D printer revolution. It is described in the video on the right.’ (via RepRapWiki).

Does anyone have one of these and want to print me out one?

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Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo

Buffalo in Meadow on Bell Ranch, 11/1972

“Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo.” is a grammatically valid sentence in the English language, used as an example of how homonyms and homophones can be used to create complicated linguistic constructs. It has been discussed in literature since 1972 when the sentence was used by William J. Rapaport, an associate professor at the University at Buffalo. It was posted to Linguist List by Rapaport in 1992. It was also featured in Steven Pinker’s 1994 book The Language Instinct. Read on to parse the sentence. (via Wikipedia).