A Guide to Finding Great Art While in Isolation

imageSo you’re stuck at home. There’s a pandemic. What to do?

Maybe you’re into art. Or maybe you’re not — but you always secretly thought you might be if you only had the chance.

Well, now you have the chance. But of course, there’s a problem. Almost all of the art museums have closed. It’s depressing. The incredible Degas show …? Shut. The Gerhard Richter show — maybe the last major one in his lifetime — at the Met Breuer? Closed for business. Just like everything else.

Don’t worry, friends! The museums will eventually reopen. But in the meantime: We are so lucky. There are options galore online…

From the soothing how-to-paint videos of Bob Ross — perfect if you’re feeling anxious — to William Kentridge’s 2012 Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard University — the most brilliant, challenging and entertaining series of lectures on art ever delivered — there’s something to suit every mood, every taste, every flavor of idleness.

Here are some of my favorites…

Via Washington Post

Top 2009 Fiction According to The Believer

New novels in a Berlin Bookshop (Dussmann, das...

‘We also asked our readers to fill out a survey card included in the January 2010 issue indicating which they thought were the three strongest works of fiction published in 2009. The top twenty most-represented novels we received from readers follow. Below that, please find a selection of additional eligible titles that received several honorable mentions.’ (The Believer)

Do you still read fiction?

“They don’t know that we know they know we know.”

Image of the human head with the brain. The ar...

Next Big Thing in Literary Theory: ‘At a time when university literature departments are confronting painful budget cuts, a moribund job market and pointed scrutiny about the purpose and value of an education in the humanities, the cross-pollination of English and psychology is a providing a revitalizing lift.

Jonathan Gottschall, who has written extensively about using evolutionary theory to explain fiction, said “it’s a new moment of hope” in an era when everyone is talking about “the death of the humanities.” To Mr. Gottschall a scientific approach can rescue literature departments from the malaise that has embraced them over the last decade and a half. Zealous enthusiasm for the politically charged and frequently arcane theories that energized departments in the 1970s, ’80s and early ’90s — Marxism, structuralism, psychoanalysis — has faded. Since then a new generation of scholars have been casting about for The Next Big Thing.

The brain may be it. Getting to the root of people’s fascination with fiction and fantasy, Mr. Gottschall said, is like “mapping wonderland.” (New York Times )