Oakland Follows Denver in Decriminalizing Magic Mushrooms

‘…The Oakland City Council on Tuesday voted unanimously to decriminalize magic mushrooms and other psychoactive fungi and plants, ordering law enforcement to stop the prosecution of possession of natural psychedelics. The decision came less than a month after Denver voters approved decriminalization of psilocybin mushrooms, with an initiative that bars the city from using resources to pursue criminal penalties for people over the age of 21 who use or possess psilocybin…

The resolution doesn’t allow for farming or commercial sales of natural psilocybin and clarifies that people who have post-traumatic stress or depression should speak to a doctor before using psilocybin. An amendment also advises that users “don’t go solo” when using psilocybin. The resolution only covers natural psilocybin—not MDMA, LSD, or other synthetic drugs.

As Associated Press points out, psychedelic mushrooms are still illegal under state and federal laws…’

via Gizmodo

Could Trump Make U.S. A Dictatorship?

Trump’s history-mimicking, incremental assaults on democracy

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’Trump hasn’t made a blatant lunge for dictatorial power. But his intermittent impulses toward autocracy have made it necessary for advisers, Congress and courts to contain him.

He argued during his campaign for the efficacy of torture and prosecuting his opponent, Hillary Clinton. He has threatened media whose coverage he found insufficiently admiring, and tried to suppress the Trump-damning book “Fire and Fury.”

He proposed an un-American religious test for immigrants and refugees to ban Muslims; infected the body politic with nepotistic and business-crony appointees; shrugs off Russian meddling in our elections; and discussed a mass roundup-cum-deportation of illegal immigrants…

To top it off, the president plays fawning footsie with real dictators.…’

Via WBUR Cognoscenti

Related: How America could become a dictatorship (Google search)

Ravens Spread Negative Emotions to Their Friends, Study Finds

1558461476225 201011 webRavens get bummed out if they see a feathered friend who’s in a bad mood, according to a study published on Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The adoption of feelings expressed by others is known as “emotional contagion,” and while it’s familiar to humans, it’s not as well understood in other social animals. Examining the phenomenon across species could shed light on the evolution of important abilities such as empathy, according to the study, which was led by Jessie Adriaense, a PhD student at the University of Vienna.…’

Via VICE

Did an era of lightning burn humanity out of the trees?

Unknown’A new paper just published in the Journal of Geology puts forth a new idea: A pair of supernovae ionized our atmosphere to such an extend that lightning became exceptionally common, and burned down the trees in which our ancestors lived.

The paper’s lead author, physicist and astronomer Adrian Melott of the University of Kansas, says, “It is thought there was already some tendency for hominins to walk on two legs, even before this event. But they were mainly adapted for climbing around in trees. After this conversion to savanna, they would much more often have to walk from one tree to another across the grassland, and so they become better at walking upright. They could see over the tops of grass and watch for predators. It’s thought this conversion to savanna contributed to bipedalism as it became more and more dominant in human ancestors.”…’

Via Big Think

R.I.P. ‘heroic icon of modern rock’n’ roll’

Roky Erickson dies aged 71

4066‘…Erickson’s death was confirmed by his representatives in a statement that described him as a “heroic icon of modern rock’n’roll and one of the best friends the music ever had”. The cause of death had not been released and the representatives appealed for privacy for his family.

ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons, a long-time friend, said: “It’s almost unfathomable to contemplate a world without Roky Erickson. He created his own musical galaxy and early on was a true inspiration.”

Erickson was the frontman of the 13th Floor Elevators, a psych-rock band from Austin, Texas, where he grew up. Their rollicking debut single, You’re Gonna Miss Me, included on the Nuggets compilation that defines 1960s garage rock, remains one of the most celebrated songs from that scene – REM’s Peter Buck once described it as “Louie Louie, sideways”. It reached No 55 in the US charts and prompted a TV appearance on American Bandstand; Janis Joplin at one point considered joining the band.

The band were advocates of the use of LSD and their work became increasingly expansive – their eight-minute song Slip Inside this House, from their second album, would later be covered by Primal Scream.

Erickson struggled with mental health issues throughout his life, and was frequently treated in hospital for schizophrenia. When he was arrested for marijuana possession in 1969, he chose to be admitted to a psychiatric hospital instead of taking a jail term – he ended up spending three years in a maximum security hospital and was given damaging electric shock therapy. The hospitalisation brought the band’s career to an end, though they reunited for one-off gigs in 1984 and 2015.

Erikcson continued solo, with backing bands including the Aliens and the Explosives, though his mental health continued to suffer and he performed less in the 1980s and 90s. He was married twice and had three children. He told the journalist Nick Kent that he was an alien, something he confirmed to the Guardian in a 2007 interview: “At one time I had it notarised that I was from another planet. By a lawyer.” In 1989, he was arrested for stealing his neighbours’ mail, though the charges were later dropped. His younger brother, Sumner, was given custody of him in 2001.

Improved health meant that he returned to performance, collaborating with bands including Mogwai and Okkervil River. Both acts paid tribute to him on Saturday, the latter describing him as “the most beautifully unique person I’ve ever known and perhaps the most brilliant”.…’

Via The Guardian

Donald Trump pardons two war criminals and the country shrugs but the world is watching

West Pointer and journalist Lucian K. Truscott IV, writes:

‘War crimes are unique. Only during a war are you empowered to legally kill other people and given the weapons necessary to kill by the state. But the cases of the soldiers and sailors charged with war crimes have become just another norm for Trump to violate. This time, he has pardoned a murderer, something that no president has ever done. Enemies will remember these things. They will fight harder. They will kill more Americans.

We’ll be paying for Trump and his own war crimes for a very, very long time….’

Via Salon

Why Does English Have More Words for Sports Officials Than Any Other Language?

The terminology for sports officials in English makes no sense and has no pattern—or if it does, it’s so riddled with holes as to be pointless…

Image’WHEN TALKING SPORTS, USING THE wrong terms—referring to a basketball game as a “match,” say, or talking about “points” in baseball—will immediately give you away as a non-aficionado, a person who doesn’t even have a grasp of the basics. But one of the oddest sets of terminology is what to call the uniformed people who make the rule decisions in the course of a sporting event. “This realm of vocabulary is one of the things that can expose you as someone who doesn’t know a ton about a sport, because it’s so unpredictable and so uneven from sport to sport,” says Seth Rosenthal, a writer, producer, and host at the sports publication SB Nation.

Mention the referees at a baseball game or the umpire at a basketball game and it’s clear you know nothing. And that’s perhaps a little unfair because the terminology for sports officials in English makes no sense and has no pattern—or if it does, it’s so riddled with holes as to be pointless. This is not the case in other languages (with one pretty major exception). In English-speaking countries sports officials have a dizzying array of names, without any kind of unifying structure as to the role each plays.

How is it that the United States, England, Australia, and other Anglophone countries have so thoroughly stumbled over what to call our sports officials? Around the world, from France to Japan to Brazil, the naming of sports officials is clear, consistent, straightforward. But in English, it’s more like a trap.…’

Via Atlas Obscura