“I’m an E.R. Doctor in New York. None of Us Will Ever Be the Same”

This long New York Times piece by an E.R. doctor and writer is worth your while as a cure for the complacency and numbness we are all feeling, perhaps largely unrecognized. Going into the hospital to do my job as a doctor each day, it has become automatic and unfeeling to don my protective gear and keep my distance. This piece is a window into the soul of someone on the front lines (I am not) and the toll that the ‘new normal’ is taking. If she worries (as she reflects in the piece) if it is even worth it being a physician anymore in the face of this virus which paralyzes thinking, feeling and caring people with its apparent ability to do what it will, perhaps writing this is redeeming.  Moral injury from dealing with the epidemic will be a persistent and  growing problem long after people have come off the respirators and stopped dying from the virus. I hope my capacities as a mental health professional can be of some use in adressing it going forward.

One thought on ““I’m an E.R. Doctor in New York. None of Us Will Ever Be the Same”

  1. Rich 18 Apr 20 / 12.50 pm

    More drama.
    At least ophthalmology and ER medicine are finally addressing the prevalence of moral injury and PTSD among their professional cohort.

    From a physician taken off the front lines and replaced by an optometrist.

    Sincerely

    Like

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